light-and sound-therapy

Light and Sound therapy

Light and Sound Therapy used at MHC®

light-and sound-therapy

Light / Sound therapy (also known as sound healing, brain synchronization or binaural tones) safely guides you into a deep mental state called Theta. In laboratory tests with sound therapy, Theta brainwaves produced several health benefits including: increased immune functions; enhanced memory; increased brain functions, increased libido, pain reduction and improved sleep patterns.
These rejuvenating brain waves, Theta waves, are also produced during REM sleep (Rapid Eye Movement). One way that sound therapy enhances mental functions and immune responses is by making up for lost REM sleep. The restorative and healing benefits of REM sleep are exactly like those of Theta brain waves induced by sound therapy.

Deprivation of REM sleep (Theta) is responsible for numerous illnesses and diseases, premature aging, increased sensitivity to pain, mental cloudiness and mental confusion. Even people who get 8 hours of sleep can still be deprived of REM sleep if their sleep is interrupted or if they drink alcohol or smoke cigarettes on a regular basis. Tobacco, alcohol and anti-depressants are notorious for decreasing REM sleep time, thus reducing time in Theta. Are you getting enough Theta?

CREATING A HIGH PERFORMANCE MENTAL STATE

The high-performance mental state occurs when a specific frequency of sound enters one ear while another frequency enters the other. The brain then creates a single frequency (or rhythm) out of the two rhythms. In creating a single frequency, the left and right hemispheres of the brain “synchronize” and enhance the communication between both sides of the brain. In doing so, the brain adapts to the new complex mental stimulation, resulting in a dramatic increase in brain activity. As a result, a state of “higher thinking” is created within the brain.

Scientists like this high-performance mental state to that of Zen meditation. This comparison is not far off considering that those who practice Zen meditation spend the majority of their meditation producing Alpha and Theta brainwaves. Like Zen meditation, sound therapy builds new pathways within the brain that, with daily use, evoke quantum leaps in mental and emotional growth.

In laboratory tests, Theta brainwaves induced by sound therapy produced a 15% – 50% increase in the production of several beneficial neurochemicals such as acetylcholine, serotonin, beta-endorphins and vasopressin which increase mental focus and memory, reduce stress, prevent depression and boost immune functions. This increase in neurochemicals occurs after the third day of listening and becomes more and more evident with daily use.

HOW IMPORTANT IS SEROTIN?

Studies show that there is a chemical hierarchy in humans associated with social “rank” that is linked with serotonin levels. Those in high office, higher positions on sports teams and those of higher rank in academic clubs have been found to have higher levels of serotonin than their lower ranking peers. Low levels of serotonin are associated with depression, violent behavior and suicide. Many anti-depressants are designed to boost serotonin levels

HOW IMPORTANT ARE BETA-ENDORPHINES?

Beta endorphins are the body’s natural pain killers. Normal levels of beta-endorphines enhance our overall sense of well being. High levels are associated with feelings of immense joy and euphoria. People with normal to high levels of beta-endorphines are less likely to drink alcohol while those with low levels are at a much higher genetic risk of becoming alcoholics.

HOW IMPORTANT IS ACETYLCHOLINE?

Studies show that increasing acetylcholine levels improves performance in a variety of memory and intelligence tests and increase alertness. Low levels of the neurotransmitter are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

HOW IMPORTANT IS VASOPRESSIN?

Normal levels of vasopressin aid, in part, to the formation of memories. It was approved by the FDA to regulate the bladder, however, vasopressin is used by many as a treatment for amnesia. Low levels of vasopressin are associated with violent and aggressive behavior

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